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Apple’s Irish Data Center Facing New Legal Challenges as Locals Plan March in Support – mytutorials.xyz

It’s been three months since Apple finally gained approval to build its massive data center just outside of Athenry in Galway County, Ireland, and now “a small handful of locals” have been reported as working to derail Apple’s data center project since the company got approval in August. The residents have filed complaints with Galway County Council, local planning body An Bord Pleanála, and most recently have taken it to High Court (via Business Insider).

Apple is now trying to get the High Court to fast track the case brought upon by the three individuals in Athenry, mainly by putting the dispute on a “commercial list,” a dedicated section of the court which deals with cases that have more than €1 million at stake. For the data center in Ireland alone (one of similar scale is going up in Denmark), Apple plans to spend €850 million.

Apple Data Center
Not all of the locals are against Apple’s attempts to build in the area, however, and are planning a march in support this weekend “to show Apple, and the whole world, that the vast majority of Athenry people support wholeheartedly Apple’s desire to open a data centre near our town.” In the Apple for Athenry March Facebook event, the supportive residents of the town mention a fear that if negative opinions continue to mount against Apple’s appearance in the area, the opportunity for community growth could “slip through our fingers.”

“We want to show Apple, and the whole world, that the vast majority of Athenry people support wholeheartedly Apple’s desire to open a data centre near our town

PLEASE ATTEND THIS EVENT, AND MAKE EVERYONE YOU KNOW AWARE OF IT.

This is a marvellous opportunity for Athenry, and the West Of Ireland. Please do not let this opportunity slip through our fingers.

PLEASE DO NOT UPSET THE APPLECART”

The next step for Apple will be on November 7 — the day after the organized support march this Sunday — where the High Court will consider Apple’s motion and either agree to the fast track plan and see the issue settled within the next few months, or prolongate the company’s attempted construction even more. Original objections to the site referenced wildlife issues, local golf course flooding, and the center’s proximity to nearby nuclear power plants.

Once it would start building the data center, Apple has laid out a 10-15 year construction plan for continued expansion and growth of the location, which is intended to power services like the App Store, Apple Music, Apple Pay and iCloud.